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Home > Where are we now?
While we are on tour, Australia So Much to See will have only minimal updating.  New travelogues and new articles will be added after we return home.  Watch for posts of where we are as we tour this great country of Australia.
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Cameron's Corner marker, at junction of South Australia, New South Wales and Queensland
Corner Store at Cameron's Corner, Queensland where caps line the bar and dining rooms and customers leave money pinned to the ceiling
Entry silhouette on the northern entrance to Tibooburra, New South Wales
Entry silhouette on the eastern entrance to Tibooburra, New South Wales
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Some of the road, on the better Queensland side, between Tibooburra, New South Wales and Noccundra, Queensland. This was a good unsealed road and very different to the southern side of Warri Gate
Free camping along this lovely large pool on the Wilson River at Noccundra, Queensland. There are public toilets and showers back at the Hall adjacent to the Hotel
Lots of silhouette farm animals along the median strip of the main street through Quilpie, Queensland. Free Wifi at visitor centre and library. A very good caravan park at Quilpie, with well thought out amenities.
At the Charleville Bush Caravan Park, Queensland, dampers are cooked in camp ovens every night. Always plenty going on for those who want to join in. Tonight it is a camp oven dinner.
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At Thallon in Queensland where a work of art on the grain silos in the town was completed only a week ago. Already steady stream of visitors has viewed the spectacle.

Even better in the golden glow of dawn (above right), taken from our caravan doorway using a bit of zoom.
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Twenty years of carving and painting, and the work continues for artist Ron Canlin. An huge range of topics are carved into the sandstones walls of this former opal mine. An amazing display twelve metres underground at Lightning Ridge.
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With a cool change in the weather, a couple of days soaking in the hot water at Billing Bore Bath was warming and relaxing.

A large camping area surrounds this facility, where the Artesian water comes out of the ground at 37 c.


Moving on to Baradine, to the loop walk around Dandry Gorge. This walk has been enhanced with a number of different sculptures, depicting the cultures and nature.
The bronze statue (above left) of father and son is entitled First lesson, depicting a father teaching his son about the gorge and its uses for hunting. Crafted by Brett Garling.

The two sided sculpture (above centre) by Barkadji Elder, artist and sculptor Badger Bates depicts Connections, incorporating the Earth, moon and stars, the emu as seen in the night sky laying eggs, the Rainbow Serpent and the Warrumbungles.

A series of mosaic statues by artist Pamela Denise entitled Respect Mother represents the germination from seed or egg. It is about how women in the Pilliga have used natural resources.
Above shows the rock face that lines gorge and carries the sculptures along the top of this ridge.


At left is the fire lookout tower at Salt Cave. At a high point in the fire prone Cypress Pine filled Pilliga forests, this is the latest of a long history of towers. An automatic lightning strike recorded tells us that to date, this tower has been hit by lightning 88 times.

The tower is open to the public to climb, and shows distances and directions of key places. Mount Kaputar is visible in one direction, and the closer Warrumbungle Range is clearly seen in the opposite direction.
The Sandstone Caves have been eroded into the face of a large rock with sheer cliff edges. There are Aboriginal etchings, paintings and artifacts in some of these caverns.
See next page to follow our continuing journey