Australia So Much to See

 

Want to know more? Ask us
< Previous
travasmtc2009b001005.gif
Next page >
Home
Travelogues
Tips and Hints
Lists and Links
Q & A
Contact
< Previous
travasmtc2009b001005.gif
Next page >
Home
Travelogues
Tips and Hints
Lists and Links
Q & A
Contact
Home > Travelogues > 2009 Travelogues Index > Carnarvon National Park > Mount Moffatt

Mount Moffatt in the Carnarvon National Park

 

tn_mtmwindowrock.jpg tn_mtmwindow.jpg tn_mtmtopshelter.jpg tn_mtmtombs3.jpg tn_mtmtombs2.jpg tn_mtmtombs1.jpg tn_mtmrotaryshelter.jpg tn_mtmroofofqld.jpg tn_mtmmtmoffatt.jpg tn_mtmmonitor.jpg tn_mtmmarlonkiss.jpg tn_mtmmarlongarch.jpg tn_mtmlotswife.jpg tn_mtmkoookburra2.jpg tn_mtmkookaburra1.jpg tn_mtmduchess.jpg tn_mtmdargonellyrockhole.jpg tn_mtmchimneys.jpg tn_mtmcathedralrock.jpg travasmtc2009b025001.jpg

To reach the plateau in the Mount Moffatt section of the Carnarvon National Park by road involved driving over 300 kilometres via Injune and heading into the highlands.  This part of the Carnarvon Gorge National Park can be accessed with a dirt road capable caravan and tow vehicle.  Roads within the park may be closed following rain. 

 

The Mount Moffatt area has a history dating back at least 19,500 years, as dated from fire beds uncovered in a cave later used by legendary outlaws Patrick and James Kenniff. The Kenniff brothers became wanted men due to their cattle stealing, so with their horses they took refuge in the relatively inaccessible ranges. 

 

Cattle were run in the area from the 1860s until 1979, when the station was purchased for incorporation into the Carnarvon National Park. 

 

  

 

 

 

 

The symmetrical Mount Moffatt that gives the park its name.  At 1,097 metres above sea level, Mount Moffatt is not the highest peak or point within the park. 

 

Nearby a walk of almost six kilometres combines the Looking Glass, the Duchess, the Chimneys and the Tombs. 

Water remains in rock pools at Dargonelly Rockhole Campground

Mount Moffatt

Nearby short walks can be taken to the sandstone pillar known as Lotís Wife and to Kookaburra Rock with numerous Aboriginal painting stencilled on the undercuts at the base of the rock as well as etchings.  This point gives views across the park to the east. 
An upright slab of sandstone with a window gives a glimpse of the woodlands through the looking glass. 
Chimney formations are created by a hard cap holding as the surrounding rocks erode leaving these chimney-like structures on top of the sandstone outcrops.  

You will see unique shaped sandstone formations in the Mount Moffatt section of the Carnarvon National Park.  Soon after entering the park, a grey weathered rock near the road is known as Cathedral Rock.  The weathered surface of this and some of the other rocks in the park give the image of scales of a giant reptile.  A short walk can be taken around Cathedral Rock.

We are in bushranger country here in the heights of the Carnarvon Range.  The cave where Patrick and James Kenniff sheltered in is now closed to the public due to instability of the cave roof.  This cave also contains some of the most significant Aboriginal rock paintings in the area.  In 1902 the Kenniffs murdered two policemen who apprehended them at the place known as Lethbridge Pocket near their lookout point, high on the northern side of the ridge and incinerated their bodies nearby.  The lookout, the site of the murder of the two policemen and the rock where their bodies were incinerated by the Kenniffs are in this high section of the park can be accessed by four wheel drive tracks.  

 

A further drive through the mahogany forest ends at the source of Carnarvon Creek high in the Consuelo Tableland. 

To travel beyond these features, a four wheel drive vehicle is required.  The Rotary Shelter Shed campground has extensive views across the park in a southerly direction. 

The track beyond the Dargonelly campground passes the Marlong Arch where a natural bridge of sandstone forms a slender archway with the two sides linking in the centre like outstretched necks of dragons meeting to kiss.   

The Duchess is a bell tower shaped formation high on a sandstone outcrop.  

The Tombs are found in a large sandstone outcrop with small caves at the base.  The caves are now empty as the remains of those interred there were stolen during the early 1900s.  Corpses were wrapped in cylinders of bark from the Budgeroo tree and were bound with animal hides.  The cylinders were decorated with ochre and placed into the caves under the rock.  Stencil paintings of hands, feet and kangaroo feet in red and yellow ochre remain on the surfaces around these caves and include the unique stencilled image of a man.  

 

The slow drive up the four wheel drive ridge-top track terminates at the Top Shealter picnic area, leaving you feeling you are at the top of the world as at over 1,200 metres above sea level, the folds of ranges extend below you.   Although not the highest peak in Queensland, this area of the Great Dividing Range is referred to as the Roof of Queensland. 

A large Lace Monitor took to the safety of tree. 

travasmtc2009b001003.gif
Continue reading >
travasmtc2009b001002.gif

Back to top ^

Copyright (C) 2013 AustraliaSoMuchtoSee.com. All rights reserved