Australia So Much to See

 

Copyright (C) 2013 AustraliaSoMuchtoSee.com. All reights reserved
< Previous
Next page >
Home
Travelogues
Tips and Hints
Lists and Links
Q & A
Contact
< Previous
Next page >
Home
Travelogues
Tips and Hints
Lists and Links
Q & A
Contact

Bald Rock, near Tenterfield, New South Wales 

tn_bald_rock_woodland_dsc06413.jpg tn_bald_rock_woodland_dsc06490.jpg tn_girraween_from_bald_rock_dscf7493.jpg tn_bald_rock_trails_merge_dsc06437.jpg tn_bald_rock_tunnel_dscf7477.jpg tn_bald_rock_w_dsc06466.jpg tn_bald_rock_steep_dsc06513.jpg tn_bald_rock_steep_dsc06514.jpg tn_bald_rock_suimmit_dsc06465.jpg tn_bald_rock_lilies_dscf7471.jpg tn_bald_rock_lilies_dscf7475.jpg tn_bald_rock_n_dsc06477.jpg tn_bald_rock_face_dsc06440.jpg
Bald Rock in the Bald Rock National Park

Bald Rock is New South Wales’ contender for the second largest monolith in Australia and lays claim to being the largest exposed granite rock in the country. Bald Rock is 750 metres long, 500 metres wide and at the top, 1,277 metres above sea level, being 260 metres above the surrounding countryside. This large granite outcrop is with the granite belt which spans the New South Wales Queensland border.

To climb Bald Rock, there are two paths. The Rockface walk trail of 1.5 kilometres starts up a steep slope, and the Bungoona walk of 2.5 kilometres takes a gentler incline and has the added interest of rock features and flora. The trails merge with the walk to the summit continuing. We chose the scenic route.  

 

The trail starts amongst tall trees, then woodland, and on past numerous rocks with yellow flowering orchids (below), Dendrobium speciosum, Sydney Rock Orchid.  These are often referred to as Rock Lilies, which grow on the caps of the large granite rocks in the middle reaches of the climb.    

The path goes through a narrow tunnel formed by a cluster of rocks.

Coming out of the woodland to more open striped rocks, the alternative trail up the steep face joins here.
The distinctive striped top and face of Bald Rock is a landmark that stands out for quite some distance. 
 
Reaching the summit, there are views into the distance in all directions.  A cairn and a trig point mark the summit (below).
 

From the summit there are views to Mount Barney, and to Mount Lindesay 86 kilometres to the north (at right).

 

To the west we looked into Girraween National Park in Queensland and identified the peaks we had visited and climbed a few days earlier; The Pyramids and Castle Rock (below and marked below right), as well as the peak Mount Norman which we had not climbed.

We walked down the same way, then drove around to the start of the steep Rockface trail. 

The steep trail was not difficult as the rough surface of the granite rock gives a good grip, however walking 1.5 kilometres up very steep slopes would be exhausting. White arrows and dots painted on the rock mark the best way.  I would have felt confident going up, but would not have tackled it going down. 

 

A border walk along the crests of the range is a twelve kilometre loop. We did not take this longer walk.  There is an additional 6.5 kilometre return walk to Little Bald Rock, to the south of Bald Rock. 

< Previous
Next page >
Home
Travelogues
Tips and Hints
Lists and Links
Q & A
Contact
150xaskusbuttondsc09685cc2.jpg
Home > Travelogues > 2009 Travelogues Index > New England Region NSW > Bald Rock