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Home > Travelogues > 2010-2017 Travelogues Index > Walpole > The Tree Top Walk

Walpole, the Tree Top Walk and Bow Bridge Bird and Reptile Park

The Tree Top walk is set in an ancient Tingle forest between Walpole and Denmark.  Read about Tingle trees here. The platform takes you 40 metres above ground into to tops of trees on a 600 metre walkway.  We first visited the Tree Top Walk in 2005 again in 2012.  It is suitable for those with mobility difficulties although anyone in a wheel chair may need assistance on the ascent and descent of the treetop platforms.  On the Tree Top walk the platforms do sway a bit so may make some people feel apprehensive about the experience. 

 

 

 

 

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Bow Bridge

 

Heading towards Denmark from Walpole, near Bow Bridge is Dinosaur World Bird and Reptile Park.  This small park features colourful parrots, reptiles and fossils. 

 

Take a walk high in the tree tops on suspended platforms at the Tree Top Walk in the Valley of the Giants between Walpole and Denmark

In addition to the walk high in the tree tops, you can get even closer to these 400 year old giants on the Ancient Empire ground level walk.  If only doing one section, the ground level one is the more informative and interesting so the one Id recommend.  Information panels can be read around the walk trail.  The ground walk is suitable for wheelchair access without assistance.

The cost of entry to the Tree Top Walk covering both walks is $12.50 per adult, and a concessional price if you have a card such as Senior's is $9 per adult, and covers both walks. 

 

See the website here and check entrance prices on this page.

This series of photos follows the inclining platforms from the shady lower forest up into the tree tops.  Looking down to the forest floor was a real feeling of vertigo.  At the height of the walk we look across the tops of the trees. 

The Ancient Empire
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Tall trees and interpretive panels make a walk of interest to all ages amongst the Tingle trees of the Valley of the Giants. 

 

One old Red Tingle has been named the Grandma Tree, with its gnarly appearance and hollowed out base. 

 

You can walk through the base of a tree and see the stages and ages of trees from young up to 400 years old, and see huge trunks rotting on the ground. 

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Gould's Sand Monitor: These common Australian goannas can grow to 160 centimetres in overall length
Sun Conure.  These parrots from north eastern South America are friendly pets.  At this bird park they fly free and will pose on your shoulder for a photograph. 
A pair of Eclectus Parrots.  These birds are unique in the different colouring with the female bring red and blue and the male green and red.  These rainforest birds are found in north eastern Australia and the Pacific Islands. 
Red Tailed Black Cockatoo. Found in the jarrah forest areas of the south west of Western Australia, the Red Tailed Black is a large cockatoo and the only one with a flash of bright red under the tail.  Slightly smaller are Baudin's cockatoo which is usually seen in the karri forest, and Carnaby's found thorughout the south west woodlands.  Once very common birds with habitiat reduction these species are on the threatended species list. 
A female Eclectus Parrot.  Initially the male and female were thought to be two different species.

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