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Home > Travelogues > 2010-2017 Travelogues Index > Denmark  > The coastline east of Denmark
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Denmark in the South West of WA; along to coast to Albany

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On the south side of Wilson Inlet which was a first time visit for me, we visit Anvil Beach, named from the anvil shaped rock. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We explore points along the coastline as we head east from Denmark towards Albany, revisiting places we had been to in the past, and discovering even more.

 

 

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Shelley Beach now has road access and a small camping area at the beach.  In a past era, a seasonal fishing village was at the base of the sand cliff at Shelley Beach, with the only access via a very steep track down the dune which was lined with railway sleepers. There is little trace of this track remaining. 

Coming in to land

Taking off

At the top of the cliff where we started our adventure, there is now a hang gliding take off board.  Para-gliders floated high in the sky. 

Much of this section of the southern coastline has cliff faces and is accessed by keen fishermen. 

A grey granite band through the black dolerite rocks.   

One of our group, who had grown up in Albany, told us how they used to lower themselves down on ropes in the deep narrow chasm known as The Chimney. 

West Cape Howe is the southernmost part of Western Australia and much of it can only be accessed by a challenging sandy four wheel drive track, some of which has had matting placed on the dunes.  This took us to a rugged black rock coastline.  We did not get to Torbay Head, which is the southernmost point within the park. 

Hartmans Beach is accessed via a four wheel drive track not far from Cosy Corner.  Here the Karri forests were once felled and exported to South Africa as mining timber, with logs being dragged to the beach for sea transport.  

Mutton Bird Beach and Shelter Island near Elleker.  We used to sit on these sloping rocks to go fishing, and as this beach was the closest to our cottage it was the one I used to take my toddlers to play on the beach. 

At Cosy Corner there are two separate areas; a small camp ground and a day only area. 

 

Lowland Beach is another small beach which is easy to access.  A long walk can be taken to the larger nearby Second Beach which is not accessible by road.  Small streams run into the ocean across each of these beaches.

A small jetty at the far side of Wilson Inlet, looking across towards the town
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The beach at the Cosy Corner campground. 

We continued exploring on towards Albany where twelve wind turbines, which have been visible to us in the distance for much of the way, are placed on the windy top of the cliffs.  With information plaques and a formed walk, this is more interesting than other wind farms we have seen.  The total project cost was $44 million.  The turbines are expected to last twenty years. 

 

 

 

More about Albany and the surrounding coastline following.   

Opened in 2001 the Verve Energy Albany Wind Farm consists of twelve turbines, with a feasibility study into adding a further six currently being undertaken.  Winds as low as seven kilometres per hour will turn the turbines, and at about 120 kilometres per hour the turbines shut down to prevent damage.  On average, there are only seven days per year when the wind is not strong enough to turn the turbines. 

 

The turbine towers are 65 metres tall with a 50 tonne generator on top driven by three 35 metre long blades.  At present the wind farm provides 50% of Albany’s energy needs, and the proposed expansion would bring this up to 80%.  Computers in the base of the towers link the to the control centre in Perth, from where operators can adjust the output of each turbine. 

 

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