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Home > Travelogues > 2010-2017 Travelogues Index > Wheatbelt > Granite Loop Trail
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Continuing our northern wheatbelt Big Rocks tour following the Granite Loop Trail we see two of the best.

Once down off the rock on the other side, we followed another wave face and the forty metre tunnel known as Monty’s Pass where the top of the wave has broken and slid down to create the chasm.  In the heat of the day, the cool of the rocks in the tunnel was very welcome. 
 
Camping is permitted at Elachbutting Rock.

From a point further along, vehicles can access the rock and drive right over it, however we chose to walk not drive.  From the top we watched harvesters working as wheat harvesting had commenced. 

Next we went to the large outcrop Elachbutting Rock. The name Elachbutting, pronounced EE-lack-butting, is thought to mean "that large thing standing" and it is a huge rock. 

 

 

There is a wave face hidden by vegetation at the main picnic and camping area.  Follow the path through the shrubs and enjoy walking along the base of the curve in the shade of the overhang above you. 

 

From near here take a short climb to the top of this massive rock. 

After droughts in the 1970, 1980s and 1990s it was time to drought proof the tank.  In 2000 a 32 kilometre pipeline connected Arnolds Tank north east of Wialki, to Beringbooding Tank.  Today the tank is still being used for crop spraying and drinking water for livestock.  It is untreated so not recommended for human consumption. 

 

Chris and Valdis visit and camp at some of these large rocks in 2016

Adorning the peak is a rock cairn established in 1889 by surveyor H.S. King, with magnificent vistas in all directions. 

Called over to investigate a possible small snake sighting, the debate was on as to whether the animal which was dead when found was a snake or a legless lizard.   On inspection it was a legless lizard, with vestiges of rear legs and a very long narrow tail giving the snakelike appearance.  It is known as Common Scaly-foot (Pgopus lepidopodus).  Lovely patterning on this slender reptile. 

Moving on to Beringbooding Rock for the night, we found a recently upgraded small camping area.  This rock has historical interest as well as having a large gnamma hole where water collects. 

 

The contoured stone walls constructed to deflect and collect the water are an engineering masterpiece, harvesting the water from all faces of the rock and diverting the water in channels around the rock and into the large tank.  Walls deflect the water away from gnamma holes and natural depressions to maximise the amount of water harvested.  

Beringbooding Tank, completed in 1937 was built over a two year period by sustenance labour, providing work for approximately 100 men.  Employment duration depended on how many children each workman had as they were paid in food supplies.  Workers came by rail from Perth each week to Bonnie Rock station.  All food supplies came from Blenkinsopp's Store in Warralakin.

Beringbooding Rock is the site of the largest rock water catchment in the southern hemisphere.  Built in 1937 by sustenance labour at a cost of 10,000 pounds at the time, it holds over two and a quarter million gallons of water when full.

 

The rock boasts an amazing balancing boulder, two huge gnamma holes and the Kalamaia tribe's paintings of hands in a cave just east of the rock.

 

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