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tn_sailchestdscf7299.jpg tn_jettytimberdscf7300.jpg tn_flindersbaydscf7291.jpg tn_junesbeachdscf7418.jpg tn_flinders_bay_jetty_dscf7288.jpg tn_flinders_bay_jetty_dscf7282.jpg tn_railtosailsdscf7292.jpg
Home > Travelogues > 2010-2017 Travelogues Index > Augusta > Flinders Bay, Augusta
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The small Flinders Bay settlement at Barrack Point, on the south side of Augusta. 
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Walking from Augusta to Flinders Bay Caravan Park where the walk trail ends or driving along Albany Terrace which also follows the coastline, you will see The Landing Place monument, where settlers from the ship Emily Taylor landed on 2nd May 1830.  The group included John and Georgiana Molloy, brothers John and Charles Bussell, James and Maria Turner with their seven children.
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Nearing Flinders Bay settlement a small beach was signed as June’s Beach.  This beach is named after June Webb, who lived nearby during the 1950's and 1960's, and is said to have been at the beach more often than at home.  June died at the age of 68 in 1999 and is buried in the Karridale cemetery.

Near Barrack Point, a memorial commemorates the whaling history of the Flinders Bay coast.  American whaling ships were calling into Flinders Bay in the early 1800s. 

 

Barrack Point was originally a port of call for the whaling ships which frequented the area and was known as The Whaling.  

 

In 1839 a whale industry was commenced at Flinders Bay, with Robert Viveash establishing a whaling station at Barrack Point in 1844. 

A small jetty in the bay at Flinders Bay

Rails and Sails is an outdoor museum display at Flinders Bay, featuring the history of timber milling and transport rail to sail. Old photos including photos of Flinders Bay and Hamelin Bay jetties, and of the early days of the timber industry are in display in a shelter.  Items on display in the outdoor area include remnants of the former Flinders Bay Jetty and other shipping relics.    

 

Above left is a sea chest, used to transport personal belongings to Augusta. 

 

These two old jetty timbers (below) were rescued from the shores of Old Flinders Bay along Albany Terrace where they have been since the nineteen thirties.  There are others buried under that sand which appear from time to time, generally after a winter storm.

 

These two were resting above water level and have been weathered by wind and sea.  Each log is the trunk of a tree that may have taken 100 years to grow to this girth.

 

Flinders Bay settlement and its historic roots

Flinders Bay Jetty, Barrack Point, Augusta, Western Australia.

 

Barrack Point was originally a port of call for the whaling ships which frequented the area and was known as The Whaling.  In 1855 Flinders Bay was officially proclaimed a port.

 

Timber was first exported from Augusta in 1876 and in 1882 M.C. Davies began construction of two large jetties at Barrack Point and Hamelin Bay.   This site, marked by a plaque on a cairn below left), was where MC Davies built his third jetty in 1882. It was extended to 1,000 feet (approximately 300 metres) in length in 1900. The jetty broke up in 1932 and only the remnants of a few pylons (below right) remain.

 

M.C. Davies had his eyes on the timber belt between Cape Hamelin and Augusta several years earlier. In 1879 he obtained a fourteen year lease for seventy thousand acres of land in the district.  Read more about M.C. Davies.

 

In 1882 he was granted a further lease of 46 thousand acres for 42 years. Within a year the Cooldarup (Kudardup) mill was operating a few kilometres from Augusta. Considered quite modern in its time, the 25 horse power mill had an output of 9,000 super feet per day. The jetties were a necessity as the timber mills at Cooldarup and Karridale were producing large quantities of cut Karri  timbers and there was a great demand for hardwoods worldwide. These timbers would be used to construct railways in India, mines in South Africa, wharves in Hong Kong and streets in London.

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Above compiled with references from West Australian Vista, State Heritage WA, and the Augusta Margaret River Shire websites and signage at the sites. 

 

 

 

 

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