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Home > Travelogues > 2017 Travelogues Index > Broken Hill, New South Wales 7

Broken Hill, New South Wales - history, mining and art

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Broken Hill Sculpture Symposium

April 2, 1992 to May 23, 1993

Officially opened by Hugh Schultz

 

The Sculptures at the Living Desert Reserve

Sculptors

 

Lawrence Beck, Koolewong, Australia (Director)

Dr. Ahmad Al Ahmad, Damascus, Syria

Badger Bates, Broken Hill, Australia

Conrad Clark (UK), Katoombah, New South Wales

Jumber Jikiya, Rustiva, Georgia

Valerian Jikiya, Rustiva, Georgia

Dr Mahomad Mira, Damascus, Syria

Thomas Munkanome, Tiwi, Bathurst Island

Eduardo Nasta Luna, Mexico City, Mexico

Antonio Nava Tirado, Mexico City, Mexico

Gordon Pupangamirri, Tiwi, Bathurst Island

Badri Salushia Tiblisi, Georgia

 

MICHAEL BUIATTI

BROKEN HILL

Facing the Day and the Night, (above) by Eduardo Nasta Luna from Mexico City, Mexico.  Eduardo injured his hand during the symposium, so it became a collective work with assistance from Catherine Mould, Badger Bates and Herbert Shiner.  The work is a monumental head that looks towards the dawn sun.  At the back the dove of night symbolises darkness.  To one side, the Wedge-tailed Eagle symbolises spirituality, height, strength and freedom.  The hands represent the sculptors. 

Bajo El Sol Jaguar (Under the Jaguar Sun), (at right) by Antonio Nava Tirado from Mexico City, Mexico. Antonio is an Aztec Indian artist.  His sculpture is based on the music of Jarge Reyes, 'Bajo El Sol Jaguar'. Use of the sun and moon depicts the duality and night is represented by the star of Venus. The mouth of the Jaguar takes the sun at night to protect it. Day is represented by the circle created by the sun.  Catch the sun setting through the circle on this, the most popular sculpture of the twelve.  

A present from Fred Hollows in the Afterlife, (above right) by Lawrence Beck (Symposium Director), Koolewong, Australia.  Lawrence studied sculpture in Sydney, London and Sofia. His work is featured in many galleries in both Australia and overseas. It was Lawrence's single-minded determination which led to the Symposium. He describes his sculpture: "My work is an extension of strata of the hill. All matter is love, even hard Wilcannia sandstone. Only Fred and I truly know what the sculpture is."

Angles of the Sun and Moon, by Valerian Jikiya, Rustiva, Georgia.  Valeri worked all night under a full moon to determine the planes and shadows for this sculpture.  The eastern face reflects the moon and the western face reflects the sun.  The shadows move continuously across the rock, thus the sculpture changes from season to season.  A sundial is located on the back of the sculpture

Horse, by Jumber Jikiya from Rustiva, Georgia.  Jumber's work is a tribute to horses.  "People must be aware of the nobility of the horse.  At Stalin's request, all the Georgian horses were slaughtered."

Nhatju (Rainbow Serpent), by Badger Bates of Broken Hill, Australia.  This carving was his first attempt at sculpting stone, having previously established a national reputation in emu egg carving and lithographs. This work is dominated by two rainbow serpents travelling north.  A pool of water was carved between them.  The footprint represents both Gullawirra journeying from Broken Hill to Mutawintji, and Fred Hollows stepping into the afterlife.

Motherhood, by Badri Salushia from Tiblisi, Georgia.  His classic sculpture theme was influenced by a sense of purity which he found at the Symposium site.  Badri commented "The Child is a portrait of my son and the fine details are left to your own interpretation."

Moon Goddess, by Conrad Clark from Katoombah, New South Wales. Conrad was born and raised in the United Kingdom. During the symposium, Conrad taught techniques to visiting students, and additional work carved at the site is now on display in the Broken Hill Entertainment Centre Plaza. Conrad's sculpture is best described in his own words, "I worked around the rock discovering, within it, the moon. I recalled an Aboriginal legend of a woman who steals the moon and places it in a dilly bag. You can see the legend in the sculpture."

Tiwi Totems, by Gordon Pupangamirri, Tiwi, Bathurst Island.  The Tiwi people of Bathurst Island have a long tradition of carving burial poles. The sculpture represents a traditional burial pole with motifs of birds, fish and a tortoise.

Habitat, by Dr. Ahmad Al Ahmad from Damascus, Syria. Ahmad is a Bedouin who grew up living the traditional Bedouin life.  His sculpture is symbolic of the shapes that keep a loving family together. 

 

The Bride, Dr Mahomad Mira from Damascus, Syria. His work depicts a reclining woman on the near point of the back, with her face and breasts facing the sunlight. On the body of the Sculpture are Australian icons; the Southern Cross, emu and kangaroo. Other symbols represent Aborigines and the City of Broken Hill. A hand is raised in greeting.

Thomasina (Jilarruwi - the Ibis), by Thomas Munkanome from Tiwi, Bathurst Island.  His sculpture of a water bird, neck stretched upward catching a fish, is named after his daughter, born during the symposium. Thomas returned to Bathurst but sadly the child died. The unfinished sculpture may be viewed as a metaphor for his child’s brief life.

Follow our visit to Broken Hill and Far Western New South Wales on the following pages