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Home > Tips and Hints > Quarantine and Exclusion Zones
Quarantine and exclusion zones

Some zones are staffed and all vehicles are stopped whereas others work on an honesty system or with part time inspectors.  What ever they are, please respect the requirements and be honest about what you are carrying.  Disease protection for agriculture is vital, so please be considerate, check what you are carrying thoroughly, and dispose of anything that could carry diseases even when there is not a manned station. 

 

To find more about the various state and intra-state exclusions, look through Domestic Quarantine and select the state you are visiting.  There are phone numbers given to check if you are not clear on what you can bring.  This brochure sets out what can't be taken across the various state borders. 

  

See these links for more detail on state requirements in Western AustraliaSouth Australia,  Queensland and Tasmania   

 

Riverlands Fruit Fly Exclusion Zone (FFEZ) spans three states; New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia. 

 

Note:  You cannot enter South Australia with fruit or vegetables of any type and you should not cross state borders into Victoria or New South Wales with host fruit or vegetables. When crossing the state border in South Australia, all fresh fruit will be confiscated, even if it has been purchased within the exclusion zone.

 

Within the FFEZ is the Sunraysia pest free zone.  This link has a good reference of which fruits may carry fruit fly Sunraysia Pest Free Zone

 

Tomatoes are a fruit and subject to fruit fly, as are capsicum and chillies, avocadoes and Aubergines (eggplant). 

 

Through some areas of Queensland there are car and caravan wash down bays to help prevent the spread of plant pests such as Parthenium

 

See more about Wash Down Bays

 

 

 

Cooked produce can be brought safely across exclusion zone and state borders.  We have a cooking night the day before reaching a border. 

 

Potatoes and onions may be accepted if thoroughly peeled and free of any soil – always declare these at the checkpoint and have the inspectors check these.  They will last a few days wrapped in plastic without refrigeration.  Alternatively peel, slice, par-boil and freeze or refrigerate.  Salad greens are just about the only thing you cannot treat. 

 

Fruit and vegetables such as green vegetables, carrots, tomatoes and stone fruit can be prepared for cooking, par-boiled and frozen or refrigerated to use in cooking over the next few days. 

 

At caravan parks, produce is readily given away to others travelling in the opposite direction.  At Penong in South Australia, caravanners travelling in either direction were heading for quarantine (Ceduna or Western Australian border), so produce was offered to the caravan park proprietress, who said she knew someone in need who always welcomed the donations. 

 

On our first trip towards the Riverlands, we thought our route would not quite meet the exclusion zone, so were happy to keep the tray of nectarines we'd just purchased.  We saw the first sign "EAT FRUIT NOW".  Still thinking our route wasn't going to cross the zone border we ate a few nectarines anyway.  Then we got to the zone border, bin and more signage "EAT FRUIT NOW" so we did - we sat there and ate the lot.  We were probably only inside the zone for a few kilometres.

Whether entering the country, crossing state borders or meeting exclusion zones set up to protect a specific type of agriculture, there will be things you cannot bring. 

 

To find more about restrictions when coming to Australia, read AQIS Travel

 

 

The following is not a complete list of items that you must declare on arrival. In many cases, items you declare will be returned to you after inspection. Some may be allowed in if accompanied by an import permit (issued by AQIS prior to arrival), or with treatment in Australia to make them safe (fees and charges apply). Alternatively, you can drop them in quarantine bins at the airport. 

Food commercially prepared, cooked and raw food and ingredients

Dairy and egg products

 Animal products

  Seeds and nuts 

 Fresh fruit or vegetables

  Live animals and animal products

 Other goods

 Plant material

Index
Quarantine restrictions on entry or re-entry to Australia
Quarantine restrictions on entry or re-entry to Australia

Internal quarantine zones

Internal quarantine zones

What to do with fruit and vegetables before crossing exclusion borders

What to do with fruit and vegetables

How to manage after your fresh fruit and vegetables have gone
How to manage after your fresh fruit and vegetables have gone

When crossing state borders, particularly when entering Western Australia via the Eyre Highway (Nullarbor), it may be some time before larger shopping complexes are reached, although limited supplies may be available at smaller places.   Soon after most borders there will be shops with a ready supply of fresh fruit and vegetables. 

 

What can’t you manage without?  Dried or tinned fruit will suffice until fresh supplies can be readily purchased.  With a back up supply of dried potato or even tinned potato, dried or frozen green vegetables and tomatoes, fresh salad is about the only meal lacking.  

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Always check you have no unwelcome passengers, be they seeds carried in soil, tyres, shoes and socks, pet fur or pet bedding, or insects or even animals as large as cane toads.  Cane Toads have proved to be clever hitch hikers and have spread quickly across the northern regions of Australia posing a significant threat to native species.
 
Soil in any form is prohibited across all borders except into Victoria, where just some exemptions apply. 

Whether you are coming to Australia from another country, or you are an Australian touring within your home country, you will meet restrictions on what you can bring into the country, a particularly state, or even a specific agricultural area.  Research beforehand will save you losing property, gifts and food.  Links on how the find out precisely what you can and can’t bring are set out on this page. 

 

Always be quite honest at inspection points as our primary production needs the protection from diseases, pests and which can so easily destroy our livelihoods and food supplies.  Significant fines apply for those attempting to breach the regulations. 

 

Read tips about what to do with your fresh produce before crossing a quarantine checkpoint or exclusion zone, and what you can use as substitutes until more supplies can be purchased.   

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What to do if you discover you have fruit or vegetables you forgot to declare

What to do if you discover you have fruit or vegetables you forgot to declare

If you have gone past a checkpoint and realise you have something you shouldn’t have kept, do not just throw it out.

 

Seal the produce, seeds or soil in a plastic bag and contact that state's quarantine as soon as possible to discuss safe disposal.

 

Australian Capital Territory 02 62076376  

New South Wales 02 63913100

Northern Territory 08 89992118

Queensland 07 34046999

South Australia 08 82077820

Western Australia 08 93341800

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Tomatoes are a fruit and subject to fruit fly, as are capsicum and chillies, avocadoes and Aubergines (eggplant)
It is vital for our cropping industry to keep declared weeds out. A few small seeds hitch-hiking on your shoelaces can be enough to do untold damage
Vineyards are found in all states, and there are strict quarantine measures to keep these disease fee