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Home > Travelogues > 2010-2017 Travelogues Index > Albany > Albany today > Albany undated

The Torndirrup National Park, Albany, revisited

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See our previous visit to the Torndirrup National Park here
In January 2016, this platform overhanging The Gap, Torndirrup National Park, was completed.  Together with a pathway and viewing platform to The Natural Bridge, the development cost $6.1 million. 
On a stormy day, the water rushing into The Gap rushed up the end of the chasm and into the air, leaving clouds of spray drifting with the wind as the water washed down the rocks.  While parked at the far end of the car park, our windscreen and windows were caked with salt. 
 
This was the best we had ever seen The Gap, and we were not alone.  Despite drizzle and a cold wind, there were many visitors, particularly young tourists from overseas. 
The water was foaming and white as incoming and outgoing currents swirled together beneath our feet.  In addition to the spray at the end of the chasm, water surge up the sides of The Gap, pouring down again as the waves retreated. 
A concrete pathway continues to a new viewing platform overlooking The Natural Bridge, where waves of white foam rushed under the bridge and out again. 
Further along coastline, at the base of the cliffs, white water surged up over the rocks. 

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Stony Hill Walk, Torndirrup National Park
An easy sealed road to a parking area leaves short walk to the summit, where there is a loop walk trail.  This area is well know for wildflowers, and those we saw are displayed in Wildflowers of Western Australia.
 
The trail gives views out into the ocean, and across the Vancouver Peninsula, King George Sound and Princess Royal Harbour to the port and town of Albany. 
 
The is a parking area near Stony Hill for those taking the five kilometre return walk trail to Peak Head.   
We finish our drive by heading out onto the Vancouver Peninsula, which creates the enclosure of Princess Royal Harbour.  We stopped prior to the gate at the entrance to Camp Quaranup, and parked at the picnic area overlooking Whaling Cove, where short but steep pathways go down to Fisheries beach.  Above left looks onto Whaling Cove, and above right across King George Sound to Gull Rock National Park and to Michaelmas Island.
 
From the car park at Whalers Cove, a five kilometre return walk can be taken along the isthmus to Point Possession, where George Vancouver claimed the whole of Western Australia for Great Britain in 1791. With inclement weather, we did not take this walk. 
 
Camp Quaranup is at the end of this drive, which is available for dormitory style accommodation for groups, in the former quarantine station hospital and adjacent nurses quarters.  Built in 1875 as a health quarantine station for immigrants, the quarantine facility was closed in 1930. 
 
 
Vancouver Peninsula, Albany