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Home > Travelogues > 2010-2017 Travelogues Index > South West, Wheatbelt and Great Southern snippets

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In the Great Southern Region and nearer the south coast, we have a view of the Stirling Ranges in the distance from our kitchen window. 
 
See also our trip through the Great Southern
Dryandra Woodland is a 27,000 hectare nature conservation area featuring the largest remnant of original vegetation in the western Wheatbelt. More than 25 mammals, 100 birds and 50 reptiles call Dryandra home, including Western Australia’s state mammal emblem, the numbat.
 
Take a guided nocturnal tour in the Barna Mia sanctuary that has become home for some of Western Australia’s native animals facing extinction.  Entry fees apply. 
 
There is an accommodation village with self catering cottages in the park as well as the Department of Parks and Wildife Congelin Campground where DPaW camping fees apply.  A new campground has opened at Gnaala Mia which is located on Godfrey Road, one kilometre west of the York-Williams Road.  There are fourteen caravan sites and four tent sites, set in the forest at least twenty metres apart. 
The Congelin Dam once provided water for steam trains when a freight railway line ran between Pinjarra and Narrogin
The Congelin Woodlands, a haven for native fauna in the wheatbelt
Moving into the wheatbelt, near the regional centre of Narrogin we visit the Dryandra Woodland Park.  It is also near the towns of Williams and Pingelly.
 
See also Northern Wheatbelt  and Midlands Wheatbelt 
 
The Dryandra Woodland Conservation Park
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Above pictures show part of the extensive recreational and picnic areas along the well developed Busselton foreshore, with a safe swimming beach for families.  There is also a netted area for completely safe swimming. 

If you don’t want to walk to the end of the mile long Busselton Jetty, a train will make it easy.  Visit the Underwater Observatory at the end of the jetty.  Descending eight metres beneath the surface, visitors can view the amazing corals and fish life through eleven viewing windows, at various levels within a 9.5 metre diameter observation chamber. 

 

This Busselton artificial reef showcases more than 300 individual marine species including vividly coloured tropical and sub-tropical corals, sponges, fish and invertebrates.
 
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Snippets about places in the area we live

Busselton
At Port Geographe, on the northern side of the town of Busselton, a canal development and marina has each house with a private jetty to moor their boat.  Views from the balcony of one of the canal edge homes.
Wheatbelt
Great Southern